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Capo IDs 374 Pink-Slipped Teachers

If enforced, the layoffs would affect art, music and the Two Way Spanish immersion program.

Students may face larger class sizes and lose some electives if the makes good on the layoff notices it sent last month to 374 teachers.

To “maximize flexibility” in a down economy, school districts need to notify by March 15 any teachers who may be let go in the coming school year. On March 1, those letters went out to 374 CUSD teachers, ranging from longtime art teachers to band directors to special education instructors.

The school district estimates it will have to . Bill Habermehl, superintendent of the Orange County Department of Education, said his department was requiring districts to plan for the very worst.

“It would be irresponsible of me to tell them to budget on the assumption that No. 1, the economy of California will get better, and No. 2, will pass. That would be speculation at best,” Habermehl said.

Although at least two tax initiatives promising money for schools are headed for the November ballot, school districts must pass their budgets by June 30.

“The only way for some of the school districts to balance their budgets is to put those pink slips on the line,” he added.

With no miracle expected from Sacramento, according to Habernehl, the stakes are high. In Capistrano Unified, here’s how the 374 teacher layoffs break out:

  • 14 tenured teachers, including all of the fine arts instructors at the district’s high schools who teach drawing and painting
  • 188 teachers are on temporary, year-to-year contracts; some of them have been working under such a contract since 2007
  • 172 were permanent or on probationary status at some earlier point, let go, then rehired as temporary teachers;  some of these teachers started with the district as early as 2001

“The services you are currently performing will not be required for the ensuing 2012-2013 school year," the various letters sent to the three types of teachers stated. See attached PDF.

Of these teachers, 24 are music teachers. Twenty-eight have special certification that allows them to teach dual immersion classes. Should all the layoffs go through, they put the into jeopardy at , with 14 teachers pink-slipped, and at , which is only in its second year of the program.

In addition, 60 special education teachers received layoff notices, as did 10 psychologists, seven counselors and two nurses.

Patch posed detailed questions about programming changes the layoffs may require to Marcus Walton, the district’s chief communications officer, but he did not respond.

Habermehl said with such draconian cuts, there’s nothing to do except get back to the basics.

“You have to figure out why are we here. The 3 ‘Rs’ -- reading, ‘riting and ‘rithmetic,” said Habermehl, who laments the potential loss of electives and advanced classes.

“It not only hurts you immediately, but it hurts you down the road,” he said, referring to imaginations that won’t get sparked, career paths that won’t be pursued.

Fewer teachers mean larger class sizes. The Board of Trustees has scheduled a public hearing at its April 25 meeting to increase class sizes in kindergarten through third grade.

The notice does not go into any detail, indicated kindergarten classes could grow by two students, from 31 to 33, and grades 1-3 could grow by one student, from 30 to 31.

Because class sizes are already set at the maximum level allowed by state law, the district must apply for a waiver from the state Board of Education to exceed those upper limits.

The number of teachers receiving pinks slips has steadily crept higher each year. Last year, the district sent out notices to teachers who filled the equivalent of . In 2010, that number was 322, according to the Orange County Register.

Three years ago, facing a $25-million shortfall, the district notified 262 teachers they may not have their job, the Register reported. Back then, 500 people jammed the trustees’ chambers to protest the possible cutbacks. In 2008, parents signed petitions and wore black in protest.

This year, there was little comment and a near-empty hearing room.

The school district also offered this year to take the district up on the deal. Interestingly, four teachers on the layoff lists are also on the golden parachute list.

Below is a chart of those teachers who work at multiple sites. The six Patches that have areas served by Capistrano Unified are publishing the details on layoffs in their cities. Click below to see each area’s list of pink-slipped teachers.

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    District Headquarters   
Name  Year  Hired  Status Position  Notes Kerry Reid  1997  Permanent 

Director Pupil Services

  Nina Glassen   2010  Temporary Teacher on Special Assignment  Multiple Sites Gayle Bentley  2010  Rehired/temp Music teacher Joanna Bowden   2009  Temporary Psychologist Megan Campbell   2011  Temporary Psychologist Chadwick Cunningham   2005  Rehired/temp Music teacher Melissa Clark   2009  Temporary Psychologist Erin Collins   2010  Temporary Psychologist Julie Curley   2010  Temporary Special Education Adaptive PE Terri Douglas   2007  Rehired/temp Nurse Shawna Ellis   2004  Rehired/temp Music teacher Alyson Fagioli   2010  Temporary Psychologist Jennifer Feeser   2011  Temporary Psychologist Diane Geller   2007  Rehired/temp Music teacher Susan Gerling   2005  Rehired/temp Music teacher Erin Glidden   2009  Temporary Psychologist Kristian Gonzalez   2009  Temporary Psychologist  Carly Hancock   2007  Rehired/temp Music teacher Lauren Harvey   2012  Temporary Music teacher Andrea Howard   2006  Rehired/temp Music teacher Tina Huynh   2007  Rehired/temp Music teacher Amelia Koskella   2009  Temporary Psychologist Dina Lachemann   2011  Temporary Special Education Adaptive PE Jeffrey Long   2011  Temporary  Music teacher Nathan O’Leary   2010  Temporary Psychologist  Ann Roche   2007  Rehired/temp Nurse Cheryl Sampson   2011  Temporary Special Education Lana Selecman   2011  Temporary Speech Pathologist Ashley Talbert   2006  Rehired/temp Counselor Julie Tayne   2011  Temporary Special Education Special Education Services Amy Butier   2011  Temporary Special Education Mild/Mod Damon Garner   2010  Temporary Alternative Instructor

Fresh Start

Melissa Quarcini  2010  Temporary Special Education Mod/Severe Julie Taylor   2010  Temporary Special Education Adult Transition

 

randy April 18, 2012 at 12:54 AM
LB- care to clarify 4 bodies are overseeing CUSD's schools? These depts are huge and have smaller number of students. You should read what OCDE supt William said about his employees need to be compensated greater than anyone else who teaching at local schools. OCR quoted this explanation by him. Should anyone believe him? He also said his OCDE teachers are working with most difficult ones than any students in OC. Yes sure. You see, this is one example of many. Bureaucauts and edurcats can say anything they want to.
Capo Parent April 18, 2012 at 01:04 AM
JG You make yourself out as an old grumpy biddy. Wright's salary information is not only public information, it was published in the OCR. It was fair game for anyone. The fact that you don't like the fact it was posted here doesn't mean beans. Your claims of cyber bulling and stalking are the pitiful cries of a bitter woman. Publishing public facts that have already been published do not constitute cyber bullying or stalking, except in the minds of the very delusional.
Capo Parent April 18, 2012 at 01:15 AM
Not bad, I like the thinking out of the box. As for the teacher evaluation, the idea of a blended approach has a lot of potential and merit from my point of view. I do think that the evaluation has to take into consideration factors the teacher cannot control like what parents will the teacher have and the level of parent involvement. Also, there has to be some means of factoring in the type/quality of students the teacher gets, GATE v. English learners. As for students evaluating teachers, I have no problem with them having some skin in the game. As for tying students scores to their parents tax rates, that makes no sense. Are you saying that students with parents that pay more taxes have a bigger voice in the evaluation process or vice versa? You're letting some good ideas get drowned by pure silliness.
Capo Parent April 18, 2012 at 01:18 AM
Let JG, Shelly and/or LB give us some concrete examples of CTA and/or CUEA trying to get education funds evenly distributed to all students in all school districts. If CTA wanted education funds evenly distributed, it would have already happen and we wouldn't be discussing the topic. It is the largest special interest group in CA and it has a strangle hold on education through its power and clout with the Legislature and even more so now with Moonbeam in office.
concerned parent April 18, 2012 at 01:18 AM
Mathteacher, I don't agree with everything you say, but I do love how you think and your willingness to try new things--a different way to evaluate teachers/merit pay, working different hours, etc. That's what's needed-- looking at a situation in a new way to try to improve it. Unfortunately, I believe your union will block those kinds of efforts at every step. By the way, I think someone suggested that I thought parents should be involved in teacher evaluations and you also mention parent evaluations being 10 percent of the formula. I personally don't believe parents should be directly involved in evaluations or decisions regarding layoffs/promotions/salary. Just as a business wouldn't have a client or a customer determine these things, a school shouldn't either. But a principal would know whether there are significant and legitimate parental complaints (or praise) about individual teachers and could take that into account in his/her overall evaluation. Anyway, my hat's off to you, mathteacher, for creative thinking about a complex and difficult problem.
Teacher April 18, 2012 at 01:18 AM
No, I'm saying that if the kid does poorly, his parents tax rates go up. Think mom and dad will get involved now? It was a bit tongue in cheek, but not by much.
Capo Parent April 18, 2012 at 01:27 AM
Interesting concept, but what if a student's poor performance is really his best performance? As an experienced teacher, I am sure you have seen the Bell Curve in many of your classes. Ironically, your comments about parental involvement is one of the advantages of charter schools (not getting into a debate about them, just pointing out one advantage I beleive they have) is that they can mandate parental involvement and volunteering, and can enforce the mandate, regular public schools can't do this.
Pam Sunderman April 18, 2012 at 01:47 AM
So much for not making it personal...
OC Mom April 18, 2012 at 02:02 AM
Math Teacher, I like your ideas about extending the day. Would it be possible for CUSD to extend school day an hour or so and then shorten the week to 4 days. I think that this might end up saving money on utilites by having one day closed. Certainly, students and teachers would enjoy having a 3 day weekend each week. We can even keep the same teacher pay. I know that I've read articles that several other States are considering doing this to save money. I also like your comment about 2 teachers able to be employed for the price of one older tenured teacher. I know from speaking to some younger teachers that it is hard for them to find employment. These people have student loans and bills to pay, yet they can't find jobs due to the older teachers who won't retire. One of my child's former teachers has been laid off before and was on one of the lists on the Patch to be potentially laid off again. That kind of uncertainty certainly isn't attracting the most talented young people to pursue teaching. I know you obviously have a vested interest in staying employed as most people do, but what can CUSD do to make their schools run more efficiently on less money per year? Please keep thinking of ideas. Our whole community needs to work to resolve this problem. I agree with you that the class slacker should not be giving teachers negative reviews.
Penny Arévalo (Editor) April 18, 2012 at 02:07 AM
Watch it CP. While you're right that we don't have a problem with publishing publicly available information (especially as it's been published elsewhere), cut it out with the personal attacks on JG. Let a reporter cover City Council in peace, please! ;-)
OC Mom April 18, 2012 at 02:25 AM
I agree with you CP. If something could be done to mandate parent involvement/responsibility I think that parents and students would be empowered and take a lot more ownership over their education. People need to realize that Education is something to be valued and esteemed. If kids are disrupting other students learning, bullying, have poor attendance and don't complete assignments, then why are they in school?The answer is probably truancy laws that make them attend and the fact that the school wants the ADA money. There should be some sort of system that after a certain number of infractions, chronically disruptive kids are moved to a continuation High School or some other program. This would be another way for teachers to be more effective in classes even if class size isn't decreased.
Paul Herzbrun April 18, 2012 at 03:32 PM
Every year, right around the push for higher taxes we hear the same thing, schools and police are going to be eliminated if ther state doesn't get more of your money. Remember last year and the year before? The system requires that pink slips must be sent out by a certain time whether they will be acted upon or not. By the way, if enrollment is down is it possible fewer teachers are needed. Given the fact that our state now ranks near the top in per student expense and near the bottom in performance maybe we could do more with less.
Penny Arévalo (Editor) April 18, 2012 at 04:12 PM
Mr. Herzbrun, regarding declining enrollment, you are correct. The district anticipates 1,000 fewer students on an average daily attendance next year. So even if funding were OK, there still would be a need to let 30 or so teachers go. But having to make $51 million in cuts with no signs that I can see that that number will get smaller, this year, many of these cuts may come to pass.
OC Mom April 18, 2012 at 04:31 PM
Penny, Does CUSD know the reason for the 1,000 student decline in enrollment? Are students' families moving to areas with a lower cost of living? Are students dropping out? Are parents' choosing to place children in private schools or homeschool them as a result of class size increases and budget cuts? I would be interested to know if it is a combination of all of these factors or if the district has figured out the cause.
OC Mom April 18, 2012 at 04:41 PM
SCN, I understand about the ADHD kids. I can say at OPA that the structure and the rules help to control or reduce a lot of the talking and blurting things out. I have to laugh at the ODD diagnosis. It seems there's a disease for everything these days. If your kid is out of control, defiant and rebellious they have ODD. Well duh, now what can we do to get them under control? I think that rules and structure help a lot. In my prior post I was talking more about kids who curse at the teachers and other students in class and generally have a lack of respect for their teachers and fellow classmates. I know someone pulling their kids out of SC High for this reason. Their child is compaining that it is a distraction to learning and it really offends them to have to be in that environment everyday and the teachers aren't able to put an end to it. I've also heard from another student that DJAMS has the same kind of behavior going on in class. Again, are students going to school to learn or are they going there as some kind of social club where they spend the day entertaining themselves by challenging teachers and tormenting other students with their out of control behavior? It is really hard for some of the other kids with ADD innattention to focus and learn in that type of chaotic environment.
Penny Arévalo (Editor) April 18, 2012 at 04:45 PM
A portion of it is the charter school expansion next year (couple hundred). I think it's just the gentrification of the area. They say no new developments have come online. There's been NO discussion about parents choosing private schools or homeschooling. Only the charter schools (mostly OPA, but also the recent addition of Community Roots) have been mentioned.
Capo mom April 18, 2012 at 05:15 PM
Lots of interesting ideas. Any opinions on LAUSD's consideration of lowering their graduation requirements? http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-lausd-college-20120418,0,1437173.story
Capo Parent April 19, 2012 at 01:05 AM
A bill scheduled for a committee hearing today would cap the compensation for two jobs at the California State Teachers' Retirement System at 150 percent of what the governor earns, but the new ceiling is twice what the positions currently earn. Assembly Bill 1735, sponsored by CalSTRS, is in front of the Assembly Appropriations Committee. The measure expands the list of jobs for which the fund's board can set compensation to include chief operating officer and chief financial officer. The fund says it needs the flexibility to compete for candidates outside of government. The bill caps what CalSTRS board could pay at one-and-a-half times the govenor's salary, $174,000. Given the new ceiling of $260,000 per annum, this bill allows CalSTRS to double existing salaries," an Appropriations staff analysis says. "The actual costs will depend on the compensation packages developed by the Teachers' Retirement Board." CalSTRS says that paying more to get the most-skilled executives will save big bucks because it will be able to hire and hold better-qualified managers who make key business decisions. The fund has said that it needs an infusion of money to meet its long-term pension obligations. In February, it reported assets of $152 billion, sustaining its pension fund for 856,000 public school teachers and their families in California's 1,600 school districts, county education offices and community college districts. The audacity is unbelievable.
shelly April 19, 2012 at 02:22 PM
mathteacher, Thank you for your commet. Teachers should not have to fix the budget crisis alone. It is a crisis caused by a downturn in the economy. During a crisis all should help including parents and taxpayers if we want to save teachers and programs. And I agree stay in your union. If not for the union people would be advocating getting rid of experienced teachers for cheaper ones. This is definitely not what is best for the children. We can have nice buildings, small class sizes, reams of paper, every program possible but if we do not have good teachers then what would be the point. Good teachers are the most important component besides the students. CUSD has good teachers and people should be fighting for them. I know somebody is going to say something negative about the union and separate it out from its members because some believe that it is the sole responsibility of the teachers to fix everything. Well, teachers can't fix it all. And tothose who blame it all on CUSD admin. and board, even if the former board were in power we would still have this crisis. It is the economy. And to those who think that we pay enough and everything should be covered, Well, it isn't. For whatever reason it isn't and it is not going to be fixed in a day. And kids are in school now. If you want to save teachers and programs and class sizes then step up and contribute whether it be local taxes or direct contributions.
shelly April 19, 2012 at 02:50 PM
mathteacher, Thank you for your comment. Teachers should not have to fix the budget crisis alone. It is a crisis caused by a downturn in the economy. During a crisis all should help including parents and taxpayers if we want to save teachers and programs. And I agree stay in your union. If not for the union people would be advocating getting rid of experienced teachers for cheaper ones. This is definitely not what is best for the children. We can have nice buildings, small class sizes, reams of paper, every program possible but if we do not have good teachers then what would be the point. Good teachers are the most important component besides the students. CUSD has good teachers and people should be fighting for them. I know somebody is going to say something negative about the union and separate it out from its members because some believe that it is the sole responsibility of the teachers to fix everything. Well, teachers can't fix it all. And to those who blame it all on CUSD admin. and board, even if the former board were in power we would still have this crisis. It is the economy. And to those who think that we pay enough and everything should be covered, Well, it isn't. For whatever reason it isn't and it is not going to be fixed in a day. And kids are in school now. If you want to save teachers and programs and class sizes then step up and contribute whether it be local taxes or direct contributions.
Capo Dad April 23, 2012 at 07:04 PM
Penny, You typically do a nice job, but shame on you for your scolding of CP. Jollygirl deserves CP's criticism for the audacious hypocrisy that she demonstrates on these pages on a regular basis.
Pam Sunderman April 23, 2012 at 07:11 PM
Capo Dad, We may not agree but we can be respectful and stay on topic.
SMT May 01, 2012 at 09:20 PM
Before it can be fixed the state needs to file for bankruptcy, then the courts will step in and reorganize calpers and calsters. The state employees, and the retired teachers and administrators will get pennies on the dollar. Then the money will be able to go where it should be going instead of propping up those two pyramid schemes.
SMT May 01, 2012 at 09:27 PM
Actually in a private company, that is not unionized. It would be the exact opposite, they lay off the higher paid people from middle and upper pay grades, and bring in young cheap workers. In the schools beacuse of the Union, it's upside down, they layoff the cheap young motivated teachers in favor of the older higher paid teachers so that they can mark the days until they can cash in on the golden retirement fund.
SMT May 01, 2012 at 09:38 PM
Don't worry in a few years they will retire on 80% benefits so you will be saving 20% in no time.
SMT May 01, 2012 at 09:50 PM
Having a Union to defend YOU against a Publicly administered entity like Public schools, or any other Publicly funded enterprise is ridiculous, you are already protected just like the rest of us, if you are not treated fairly then VOTE the people out of office. The Union is nothing more than a self serving drain on public education and responsible for propping up an unsustainable retirement program for the last 45 years, and it will soon come crashing down. The money is gone. Spent by the earlier participants in the pyramid.
Hannah July 22, 2012 at 09:39 PM
The wouldn't close San Juan because San Clemente and Dana Hills can't hold all of the students
Capo Parent July 23, 2012 at 03:18 PM
It's a very simple and easy way to increase the HS graduation rate since the old fashion way of teaching, testing and holding students accountable isn't working.
Capo Parent July 23, 2012 at 03:20 PM
Who are you and why are you using my moniker. Penny, what's the deal?
Penny Arévalo (Editor) July 23, 2012 at 04:14 PM
The same name can be used over and over again. It's a fluke of the system I hope they correct. We at one point had several Capo Moms (or was it OC Moms?). I think maybe one was intentional. If you suspect someone is posting as you, or just coincidentally has the same name, you can either post, and say, "Nice name, fella!" or ask me to confirm, and I'd be happy to double check and report back.

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